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Carolyn McNabb   PhD

Dr Carolyn McNabb

(she/her)

PhD

Lecturer

School of Psychology

Email
McNabbC1@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone
+44 29225 10259
Campuses
Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre, Maindy Road, Cardiff, CF24 4HQ

Overview

My current research focuses on understanding the microstructural properties of white matter in the human brain. More broadly, I am interested in both structural and functional connectivity in the brain and how this may differ in psychiatric disorders or as a result of treatment resistance or pharmacological intervention.  

Publication

2024

2023

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2015

2012

Articles

Book sections

Websites

Biography

Academic Positions

2023 - present: Lecturer, Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre, School of Psychology, Cardiff University United Kingdom.

2022 - 2023: Research Fellow, Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre, School of Psychology, Cardiff University United Kingdom.

2017 - 2022: Research Associate/Senior Research Fellow, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, United Kingdom.

2017 - 2017: Postdoctoral Research Assistant, School of Pharmacy, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Postgraduate Education

2017: PhD (Pharmacy), "Brain dysconnectivity as a biomarker of treatment resistance in schizophrenia". University of Auckland, New Zealand.

2012: MHSc (Experimental Psychology) - "A structural and pharmacological analysis of high impulsivity in the five-choice serial reaction time task investigating the effects of chronic cocaine and methylphenidate administration on D2/3 receptor availability and premature responding". University of Auckland, New Zealand & University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.

2010: Post-graduate diploma in Science (Pharmacology and Physiology; Distinction). University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Undergraduate Education

2006: BSc (Pharmacology and Physiology). University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Awards

2020: British Science Association Margaret Mead Award Lecture